British History / London / London History

Open House London 2016 (Part 1)

Open House London has become a regular fixture for many of the London historians, museum efininados, exhibition regulars and lovers of all things London whose blogs and Twitter accounts I follow. And this was the year that I finally got to join the party. For those that don’t know, Open House London sees hundreds of buildings across … Continue reading

Age of Enlightenment / Art / Britain / British History / Exhibition / Literature / London History / Museum / Review

REVIEW- Samuel Pepys: Plague, Fire, Revolution

In the great hall of Christ’s Hospital School in Horsham, West Sussex, there hangs a gigantic painting showing an enthroned King James II receiving the mathematical scholars of the school, painted between 1684 and 1690 by Antonio Verrio. Its impressive scale makes its extensive cast of figures appear practically life-size. Among the great crowd of dukes, earls, soldiers, bishops, courtiers and … Continue reading

19th Century / British History / Exhibition / London / London History / Museum / Photography / Review

REVIEW- Victorian London in Photographs

When it comes to an exhibition where I am sold on the title alone, then this has to rank right up there. Regular readers of the exhibitionologist will know, photographs -particularly old, scratchy, black-and-white ones- and the history of London constitute two of my special areas of interest. So the Victorian London in Photographs exhibition at the … Continue reading

19th Century / 20th Century / Age of Enlightenment / Art / Exhibition / London History / Museum / Photography / Review / Transport

REVIEW: Bridge

It’s a well-known fact that without the River Thames, there would never have been a London. The Romans, who first founded Londinium in the first century AD, used the river to connect their new province, Britannia, to the rest of their empire, and Londinium flourished as a port and a trading hub. But perhaps more … Continue reading

British History / Exhibition / London / London History / Museum / Renaissance / Review

REVIEW- The Cheapside Hoard: London’s Lost Jewels

On a hot summer’s day in 1912, a team of builders were busy demolishing a building in the City of London. Numbers 30 and 32 Cheapside were houses that had been constructed in the years following the great fire, and were set to be replaced by a new building. It was whilst excavating a cellar … Continue reading

Age of Enlightenment / Britain / British History / Culture / Exhibition / Literature / London / London History / Museum / Review

REVIEW- Georgians Revealed: Life, Style & the Making of Modern Britain

The title of the British Library’s new exhibition Georgians Revealed: Life, Style, and the Making of Modern Britain makes a bold statement about the period of history it explores. I think it’s fair to say that several historical eras could make a claim to being the one that made modern Britain and, naturally, it would … Continue reading

Art / Britain / British History / Culture / Exhibition / London / London History / Museum / Renaissance / Review

REVIEW- Elizabeth I & Her People

‘A Child And His Nurse’, painted by an unknown English artist circa 1589, is a truly remarkable portrait. The baby boy’s eyes are so bright, and his stare is so piercing, it is genuinely hard to look away. He is only a year or so old, but wears fine clothes, which have been painted in … Continue reading

20th Century / Art / Exhibition / London / London History / Museum / Review / Transport

REVIEW- Poster Art 150: London Underground’s Greatest Designs

One hundred and fifty posters collected from trains and railway stations may not sound like the makings of an absorbing exhibition. But then again, the London Underground – one hundred and fifty years old this year – is no ordinary railway, and in much the same way that the humble tube map has become a … Continue reading

19th Century / Age of Enlightenment / Britain / British History / Exhibition / History of Science / London / London History / Medicine / Museum / Politics / Review

REVIEW- Doctors, Dissection & Resurrection Men

In 1832 the Parliament of the United Kingdom passed the Anatomy Act, legalising the practice of doctors, anatomists and medical students dissecting any body that went unclaimed upon death. With this new law the medical community would no longer need to satisfy its ever-increasing demand for corpses by paying professional body snatchers – or ‘resurrection … Continue reading