20th Century / Art / Exhibition / History of Science / Museum / Politics / Review

REVIEW- Maps and the 20th Century: Drawing the Line

For a bona fide map nerd like myself, there may never have been an exhibition that I have anticipated quite as eagerly as the British Library’s Maps in the 20th Century: Drawing the Line. Indeed, any bona fide map nerd probably already knows about this exhibition and will have decided already to pay it a visit regardless of what … Continue reading

19th Century / 20th Century / Age of Enlightenment / Art / Britain / British History / Culture / Exhibition / Literature / Museum / Renaissance / Review / Shakespeare

REVIEW- Shakespeare In Ten Acts

On one of the exhibitionologist’s first forays into exhibition reviewing, back in 2012, I found myself at an exhibition all about William Shakespeare. Hosted by the British Museum and accompanied by a BBC Radio 4 series, Shakespeare: Staging the World was jam packed full of objects that each, in some way, related to the events, the places and … Continue reading

19th Century / British History / Exhibition / London / London History / Museum / Photography / Review

REVIEW- Victorian London in Photographs

When it comes to an exhibition where I am sold on the title alone, then this has to rank right up there. Regular readers of the exhibitionologist will know, photographs -particularly old, scratchy, black-and-white ones- and the history of London constitute two of my special areas of interest. So the Victorian London in Photographs exhibition at the … Continue reading

Age of Enlightenment / America / Britain / Exhibition / Medieval / Museum / Politics / Review

REVIEW- Magna Carta: Law, Liberty, Legacy

Whether or not David Cameron knew what he was letting himself in for when he appeared as a guest on The Late Show with David Letterman in 2012 is anyone’s guess. As anyone who watched the interview or subsequently read about it will know, there was at least one topic of conversation that he was not expecting to … Continue reading

19th Century / Exhibition / Literature / London / Museum / Review

REVIEW- Sherlock Holmes

We begin the Museum of London’s tour of the cultural phenomenon that is Sherlock Holmes with a dizzying wall of television screens, showing the world’s most famous detective in all his various film and television incarnations. This is immediately followed by a procession of brightly coloured film posters from around the globe, that invite us to … Continue reading

19th Century / Art / Culture / Exhibition / Museum / Photography / Review

REVIEW- Drawn by Light

The Science Museum’s Media Space, a gallery dedicated to the collections of one of its sister museums, the National Media Museum in Bradford, opened only last year. But with its latest exhibition, the Media Space shows that it is already prepared to be hugely ambitious in its vision and in its scope. Putting on a show spanning the entire history of photography, as … Continue reading

19th Century / 20th Century / Age of Enlightenment / Art / Exhibition / London History / Museum / Photography / Review / Transport

REVIEW: Bridge

It’s a well-known fact that without the River Thames, there would never have been a London. The Romans, who first founded Londinium in the first century AD, used the river to connect their new province, Britannia, to the rest of their empire, and Londinium flourished as a port and a trading hub. But perhaps more … Continue reading

Age of Enlightenment / Art / Britain / British History / Exhibition / London / Museum / Music / Review

REVIEW- The First Georgians

Unless you have been living in a cave these past few months, you will of course already know that 2014 marks the three-hundred year anniversary of the start of the Georgian era. The fact that the time has come to give this particular chapter in British history the attention it deserves, after being overlooked for far too long, is … Continue reading

British History / Exhibition / London / London History / Museum / Renaissance / Review

REVIEW- The Cheapside Hoard: London’s Lost Jewels

On a hot summer’s day in 1912, a team of builders were busy demolishing a building in the City of London. Numbers 30 and 32 Cheapside were houses that had been constructed in the years following the great fire, and were set to be replaced by a new building. It was whilst excavating a cellar … Continue reading